Expo| IamBatman

What’s the first thing we see walking in the door of the Fresh Paint gallery? BANG! WOW! KA-POW! IamBatman comes back for yet another collaboration with the gallery, this time surrounding you with what looks like a life size comic book strip, making you feel like a character in it.

Since she was influenced by comic books ever since her youngest of age from her father’s vast collection (which occupied many of the closets in her childhood home, including her own), it should come as no surprise that her exhibition turned out the way it did. Although, even the artist herself had no idea that this is what her exhibition would look like- until she actually got to the gallery to start her work. She leaves room for growth and expansion in her work, never having a preconceived idea or plan of what she will create, enabling her to steer clear of creating art to satisfy other people and to stay true to her emotions.

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Having grown up in a very creative family, art has always been part of IamBatman’s surroundings and creativity always encouraged in all its forms. Inevitably, drawing came at a very young age; “In elementary school I would draw on everything. My grade 5 teacher actually encouraged me to draw on my desks in class.” In high school, she would tag and draw secretly, never being doubted thanks to her “good kid” reputation. For her, street art has always been just another medium for making art, a “bigger, brick covered canvas”. Once she got in art school, she focused more on developing her skills instead of playing around in the streets.

Her involvement with the gallery started when Sterling approached her at one of her exhibitions after hearing about her and her work. He asked her to bring her art to the gallery walls- and it spirals form there; countless nights painting at Beaux Degats battles (the gallery’s monthly live art battle at the Foufounes Electriques), Under Pressure festival three years in a row, and this will be her second time exhibiting at the gallery. Come take a closer look before it’s gone!

https://www.instagram.com/batman_am_i/

 

The Fusion of Paulie, Mos Geez, and Ectoplasm

When artists Paulie, Mos Geez, and Ectoplasm get together to collaborate on an exhibition, they end up creating a space where your mind can indulge in the combination of three very different, yet equally creative and intriguing works. Each of these artists has known each other for many years, having met through common friends or art exhibitions.

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Ectoplasm began her journey in the arts at a very early age, encouraged by her mother’s love for it. Once she moved to Montreal from France in 2009, she started drawing more consistently, meeting a good community of artists, and did exhibitions at the gallery Usine 106u (where she and Mos Geez met). She later took her art more seriously, progressing her style to what she now has, some of which is displayed at the gallery. Bodies floating on the walls, extremities morphing into substances that meet Mos Geez’s bright distorted creature on the left, and Paulie’s human hand on the right.

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Mos Geez is a multidisciplinary artist who started off with dance, music, and drawing. She decided to stick with the arts once she reached college, where she ended up understanding her emotions through painting. What strikes her most are images that are disturbing, provocative, surrealist, and shock viewers. Her inspiration comes from these types of images, along with, most powerfully, her emotions.

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Paulie has been making art since a very young age, constantly drawing and experimenting until today. In France she studied literature, graphic design, and went to art school later on where she mostly studied contemporary art. After being in Montreal for awhile, she got back into making art when her friend Lapin came to visit her (an artist who has also collaborated with the gallery many times), during which time they would roam the streets, doing murals and graffiti in Hochelaga (and during which time she discovered Fresh Paint gallery!). Expressionism, geometry, and conceptual art are her main inspirations.

To bind the installation together, the artists decided to give it the theme of a forest. Each of these artists has already worked with the gallery at least once- Paulie has participated in Beaux Degats before, her first one being in 2011, and has done a collaborative exhibition at the old location of the gallery; Mos Geez has done Under Pressure two years in a row, Beaux Degats, and the Queens Creation exhibition earlier this year; Ectoplasm has done Beaux Degats and Queens Creation.

Whether or not you have already encountered these artists’ works during one of the Beaux Degats or exhibitions, a visit will be well worth your time to see the result of the combination of three very creative artists works.

Ectoplasm | Mos Geez |Paulie Heart

Expo | BC TO MONTREAL

Having worked together in the city of Victoria, Mikhail Miller, Shane Anus, Issaac Holland, and Rachel Ziriada rejoin in the city of Montreal to create a colorful and eccentric installation in one of the rooms at the Fresh Pant gallery.

All of these four artists have a common connection through the art community in Victoria, British Colombia, working together in less formal settings like creating murals and painting trains. Working together in a more conventional setting with some more time on their hands than usual to create their artwork allowed for new ideas to emerge. Rachel’s background in installation and sculpture based art allowed for a more immersive environment within the room.

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Most of the materials used in this installation have been collected from the streets. Objects like bike tires, newspapers, and many other components were used to create the sculptural elements of the installation. A combination of pages form children’s encyclopedias and supermarket advertisements based on consumerism were used for the collages and paper mâché sculptures

Behind this lies the willingness to take everyday materials and shift their meanings to create a skewed version of reality, allowing the viewer to feel comfortable enough to create their own meaning from this imagery and participate in the formation of personal narratives within this space. This creates a parallel with the usual way in which visual images are pumped into our brains every single day without our necessarily wanting it and with prepackaged meanings, leaving not much space for personal interpretation.

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The name of this installation, “Kozmik Hoboes”, is meant to serve as a starting point for viewers to decode the visual references to the witches, aliens, creatures, and tribal wanderers found in the room, meant to make the viewer feel like they can connect with these “Othered” beings and sympathize with their sentiments. This is intended to hopefully make people sense a lessening of the intense feeling of individualistic isolation so often felt by many within our culture and society and instead use the limited time we have together here on Earth wisely.

Also, check out the Art Attack mural that Mikhail, Rachel and two other artists, Loks Can and Jean Maxime Giguere collaborated on in August, now at the gallery!

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Expo | Lapin

After his arrival in Montreal in 2011, Lapin participated at the third Beaux Degats that year with Poly Heart and Aude. did an exhibition at the gallery in 2013 with Aude and Monsieur Dupont, an exhibition at both the Fresh Paint gallery in Lyon, France and Montreal in 2014, and is back again this year for his new exhibition at the gallery and participation for the 20th annual Under Pressure festival. His invitation to paint at the gallery from Sterling came simply after he posted a photograph of his mural done in Hochelaga on the Facebook page of the gallery.

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This artist has been painting since his very early years. His father being an architect working in a family business, Lapin would draw alongside him for a long time. He continued making art in his later studies in an arts program in France for two years. At sixteen years old he would hang around “Groupe Predateur” in France, doing a lot of graffiti, skateboarding, and generally just pure vandalism. Years later, when he was a freelance graphic designer after studying in digital communication, he started making collages with the nickname Lapin. After one of his girlfriends started calling him that, he found it suited him perfectly because of its minimalistic style, simplicity, and its French language. It fulfilled his willingness to have an identity as an artist.

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As for the illustrative part of his work, he was inspired by the Manga comic books he read when he was younger. In his later years, his inspiration cam from French illustration, as well as Francobelge; Tintin, Razor, Balouse, Charlie Hebdo, mostly know for their dirty, minimalistic style with a pretty nice critique of society and having a certain type of signature personality. He doesn’t consider himself a graffiti artist, but he is linked to graffiti because of his entourage, and so has to respect the “protocols” of the community. Today, he has a hard time categorizing his art. He gets a lot of inspiration from postmodernism, mixes classic illustration with pop, with a little bit of humor. You can see that a lot with many of artists like Banksy.

As for the city of Montreal, it definitely did influence him a lot. It influenced his ways of producing in the last five years, it pulled him more towards graffiti because of his involvement in the scene here and influenced his lifestyle in a very general manner.

Don’t forget to check out his work at the Fresh Paint gallery and his new mural for Under Pressure Graffiti Festival!

Facebook | Instagram 

Expo | Clockshovel

Clockshovel came to the Fresh Paint gallery in the month of May, filling up the wall in one of our many rooms with wild apes running free in a city. This artist came to Montreal three years ago, stating that the city “inspires the hell out of him” and that there is nowhere else he’d rather be. The inspiration stems from the passion he finds in every corner of the city and the big heart he sees in the people here.

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His encounter of ape drawing came about by drawing men’s faces poorly. The first time this accident happened was while drawing a self-portrait that ended up looking like a portrait of an ape instead.After drawing that first ape, he was drawn to the animal by the fact that it has both the qualities of a beast and a man. It has the ability to show a variety of emotion on its face while at the same time remaining primarily a beast within. For Clockshovel, they are fun animals and an easy thing to paint.

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To him, it just seems like these animals mean something. He has no direct message he is trying to send with his art. He starts off his work with no preconceived notion. Just an instinct of approach, a vague idea and image, and keeps going until he likes what he sees.

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In fact, since he knows when he’s going at it that he has nothing to say, he becomes an equal member of the audience once he’s done his work. He comes back to his work once he’s finished and adds his own interpretation to it, thinking about what it might mean or what he sees in it, just like everyone else does.

The main mood of his drawings and paintings hovers somewhere between a love story and a joke. An existential joke, as he puts it. A prophet screaming in the woods who doesn’t know what he’s talking about. But once we take a look at what the prophet was saying, we could determine what we think he was talking about, and, as Clockshovel puts it, take from it what we will.

Le monde de LilyLuciole

L’artiste LilyLuciole a pris le temps de nous répondre ces quelques questions, malgré qu’elle soit en pause de son travail pour des raisons personnelles. Elle nous parle de son aventure qui a commencé il y a trois ans de cela, de ses inspirations,  son rapport à la nature, les choses simples de la vie, l’art de rue…. Rencontre!

Fresh Paint: Être une artiste a commencé comment pour toi?
LilyLuciole: C’est trop simple de dire que je suis naturellement née artiste mais c’est vrai.  Je pense que j’avais cela en moi depuis le début et c’est le cadre familiale qui a fait en sorte que cela se développe. L’environnement de ma famille a soutenu ce don. Sans elle, Lilyluciole ne serait pas née et n’aurait pas jaillit dans la rue en 2011. 

FP: Tu as un style vraiment original qui inclue  découpage, collage, et peinturage, parfois utilisant une photo comme une toile, comme tu as fait à la galerie. Comment as-tu fini avec ce style?
LL: Je dirai que je n’ai jamais cessé d’être vrai, d’être moi-même dans chaque œuvre que je fais. Je suis métisse et je pense que j’avais besoin de ce mélange de style pour trouver la forme stylistique ou esthétique qui soit proche de moi ou qui parle de moi. Je pense aussi que j’avais besoin de m’amuser et de fusionner la peinture, le collage, le découpage parce que c’est riche en explorations, en découvertes et en surprises. J’aime autant admirer un masque inuit, qu’apprécier un Rembrandt, une représentation de Shiva, regarder une architecture contemporaine ou regarder un arbre, une fleur… Mon esprit est très ouvert. En prenant du recul, je me rends  compte que ce que j’aime c’est la couleur et la lumière avant la forme.

FP: Qu’est-ce qui t’as inspiré?
LL: Toutes mes explorations visuelles et mes thèmes sont puisés dans ma vie personnelle mais aussi les arts plastiques, la musique, la danse, les voyages, et l’enfance. Je parle énormément de moi à travers mes modèles : la femme, le corps que j’explore avec la danse. Ma foi est également très présente. Mon style est totalement en décalage avec la culture pop. J’aime cela car c’est ce qui fait mon individualité. J’espère que mes prochaines œuvres vont être un hommage à la beauté de la nature vivante que l’homme en général ne cesse de maltraiter pour son profit ou de nier au lieu de la préserver.  Cette destruction est en train de creuser les inégalités sociales, économiques entre nous les hommes. Il y a d’un coté ceux qui exploitent et de l’autre ceux qui se font exploiter.

FP: Ton oeuvre qu’on retrouve à la galerie a beaucoup d’autres versions. Est-ce que les variations sont basées sur des préparations ou est-ce que les oeuvres sont créées sur le moment même?
LL: Toute proposition de création est toujours l’occasion de renouveler la forme à partir des thèmes qui me sont personnels. Ce qui demande à la fois un temps de réflexion important mais aussi de reconnaitre ses intuitions. Donc, toujours jouer sur les deux plans. Écouter ses intuitions, les faire apparaitre et ensuite les travailler.

FP: Est-ce que tu utilises des photos que tu trouves et qui t’inspirent ou est-ce que les photos sont prises pour être utilisées spécifiquement pour tes oeuvres?
LL: Je te parle de l’intuition mais elle a besoin de matière pour surgir. Le travail d’autres artistes peut m’impressionner à tel point que cela peut donner naissance à une œuvre. C’est le cas lorsque par exemple j’observe une photographie. La photographie est un matériel magique que j’aime utiliser pour activer le processus de création. Je peux également imaginer une série d’images qui sera concrétisée grâce à Yahn, le photographe avec qui j’aime travailler.

FP: Est-ce que tu peux nous en dire plus sur le projet Art Fabric sur lequel tu travailles?
LL: Je suis absolument heureuse de savoir que mon oeuvre ait pu être réapproprié par Eric Marechal et Fabi Futata. A la base lorsque j’ai commencé j’admirais déjà leur travail. En fait, je n’aurai pas cru que je ferai plus tard partie de l’aventures : Chine, Mexique, Allemagne Argentine et j’espère un jour que ce projet viendra à Montréal. Je suis très intéressée par cet art engagé.

FP: Cela manque énormément dans l’univers du Street art qui est pauvre pour créer ce type d’initiative.
LL: Je pense que le street art est en train de s’appauvrir en terme de générosité à cause de la médiatisation qu’on en fait.

FP: Tu mets tes oeuvres dans des rues un partout dans le monde. Dans quelles parties du monde peut-on retrouver tes oeuvres?
LL: Comme mes oeuvres sont en papier, je ne sais pas si celles-ci existent encore. Les dernières oeuvres que j’ai collées étaient sur Montréal et je ne sais pas si elles y sont encore. Je ne cherche pas à savoir en fait.  Je colle et ensuite je ne reviens plus là dessus. Je passe à la suivante. Je me détache de plus en plus de cette volonté  de photographier à chaque fois mes œuvres.

FP: Les oeuvres internationales sont plutôt retrouvées dans des endroits pauvres et des places où habitent des minorités. Comment tout cela à commencé?
LL: Tout a démarré dans le 19e de Paris qui était un quartier populaire et qui depuis s’est fortement embourgoisé. Il y a encore un peu un tissu social mixte mais beaucoup de choses ont changé. Du coup, lorsque je suis arrivée sur Montréal j’ai voulu continuer à  créer mes oeuvres dans ce type d’espaces.  Le projet The artFabric est aussi un moyen pour moi de donner accès à l’art gratuitement à de personnes qui sont fragilisés socialement.

FP: Comment était ton expérience avec la galerie Fresh Paint?
LL: Pour la Fresh Paint, je sentais que j’avais une envie folle de parler de mon rapport avec la natalité, le fait de donner naissance à un enfant ce qui s’est matérialisée par un ballet de méduses. Ces installations de méduses étaient une occasion pour moi de parler aussi de la beauté de la nature. Les méduses sont pour moi des êtres vivants envoutants qui gardent une part de mystère. C’est attirant. Je sais que j’ai pris en compte  aussi l’œuvre  que j’ai remplacé sur le murs. Elle m’a inspiré. Je suis perméable aux œuvres des autres artistes quand cela me parle.

 LilyLuciole

The artist LilyLuciole took the time to answer us these questions, even though she is currently on break from work due to personal problems. She speaks to us of her adventure which started three years ago, of her inspirations, her connection to nature, the simple things in life… 

Fresh Paint: How did being an artist all start?

LilyLuciole: It’s too simple to say that I was naturally born an artist but it’s true. I think that I’ve had that in me since the beginning and it’s the family environment that allowed me to develop it. The family environment supported this gift. Without it, LilyLuciole would never have been born and would not have appeared in the streets in 2011.

Fresh Paint: You have a very original style that includes cutting, pasting, painting, sometimes using a photograph as a canvas as you have done at the gallery. How did you end up with this style?
LL:I would say that I have never ceased to be true, to be myself in every piece that I do. I am a mixed race and I think that I needed that mix in style to find the stylistic form or aesthetic that would be close to me or that would speak of me. I think also that I needed to have fun and fuse painting, pasting, cutting because it’s rich in explorations, discoveries, and surprises. I love admiring an Inuit mask, as much as appreciating a Rembrandt, a representation of Shiva, looking at a contemporary architecture or look at a tree, a flower. I have a very open spirit. By taking a step back, I realise that what I love is color and light more than form.

FP: What have been your inspirations along the way?
LL: All my visual explorations and my themes are drawn from my personal life but also the arts, music, dance, travel, and childhood. I speak a great deal about myself through my models : the woman, the body that I explore through dance. My faith is also present. My style is completely deviated from pop culture. I like that because it creates my individuality. I hope that my upcoming works will be dedicated to the beauty of living nature that man in general never ceases to mistreat for it’s own profit or to denies it instead of preserving it. This destruction is deepening social and economic inequalities between us people. There are the people who exploit on one side and the ones who are being exploited on the other.

FP: You have many other versions of the artwork you have done at the gallery. Are the variations based on planning or are the works created in the spur of the moment?
LL: All proposition of creation is always an occasion to renew the form the form from themes that are personal to me. Whcih demands reflection time as well as recognizing your intuitions. So, always play on these two planes. Listening to your intuitions, make them appear, and then start working.

FP: Do you use photographs that you randomly find and that inspire you or are the photographs taken to be used specifically for your art?
LL: I speak of inuition but this needs material so that it can surge. The work of other artists can impress me to the point that a work of art is born. This is the case for example when I observe photography. Photogrpahy is magical material that I love using to activate the process of creation. I can also imagine a series of images that would be concretised thanks to Yahn, the photographer that I love working with.

FP: Can you tell us more about the Art Fabric project you are involved in?
LL: I am absolutely happy to know that my work has been reclamed by Eric Marechal and Fabi Futata. When I first started I already admired their work. In fact, I would have never thought that I would later be part of the adventures : China, Mexico, Germany, Argentina, and I hope one day that this project will come to Montreal. I am very interested in this engaged art.

FP: This is highly absent in the univers of Street art which is poor in creating this type of initiative.
LL: I think that street art is becoming poorer in terms of generosity because of the media attention we are giving it.

FP: It seems that you put your art in the streets all around the world. In which part of the planet can we stumble upon your artworks?
LL: Since my work is in paper, I don;t know of these stille exist. The last works that I pasted were in Montreal and I don;t know if they are still there. In fact I don’t plan on finding out. I paste and then I don’t come back to it. I go on to the next one. I am becoming more and more detached form this will to take photos of my work every time.

FP: The artwork you put up on the streets are mostly found in poor areas and places where minorities live. How did this all start?
LL: It all started in the 19th of Paris which was a popular area and since has been heavily gentrified. There is still a bit of mixed social classes but things have changed alot. Since I have come to Montreal, I wanted to continue to create my works in these types of spaces. The artFabric project is also a way for me to give free access to art to people who are socially weakened.

FP: How was your experience working with the Fresh Paint gallery?
LL:  For Fresh Paint, I felt like I had a crazy urge to speak about my connection with natality, the fact of giving birth to a child which materialised itself by the ballet of jellyfish. This installation of jellyfish was also an opportunity for me to speak about the beauty of nature. Jellyfish are for me mesmerizing living beings that keep a part of the mystery. It’s attractive. I know that I also took into consideration the work that I had replaced on the walls. It inspired me. I am open to the work of other artists when these speak to me.

LilyLuciole

Interview with SJ Vriend

FP  How did your life as an artist start?

SJ  I’ve been interested in drawing since the moment I could pick up a crayon, also in realism. My mother studied fine art and art history and so I think she influenced me early on to draw and be interested in making things. My grandfather was also an architect and my father owned a photography store, so I guess you could say an interest in creating and regarding images runs in the family. Even early on I had the discipline to sit down and focus on what I wanted to draw. I wanted to make things look real in my drawings, even if they were of something from imagination or fantasy. My mom likes to tell a story to guests about the time she watched me drawing a huge horse with chalk in the street when I was very young and how everything was proportionate even though it covered a very large section of pavement. I would look at photographs or other images and try to replicate the textures and forms that I saw there.

 

FP  Your work at the gallery seems to have an infinite amount of detail. What mediums do you use to accomplish that?

SJ  I use fine tipped ballpoint pens specifically for the majority of my work, often working on several sheets of paper that are collaged to a wood panel.

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FP  How long does it take you to finish one canvas?

SJ  This is an interesting question to answer and is related to the material I use. Each drawing is actually more of a long-term performance work rather than a finished object. This is due to the fact that the ink of the ballpoint pens I use reacts to the surface drawn on, light conditions and other environmental factors. The ink changes color and fades with time and so I continually work on the pieces as they age. Some parts of the drawings I could choose to bring back into focus while some of them I could let fade but in any case transformation is constant in each one. It’s like having a long lasting conversation with each piece and it’s a fairly meditative process. The primary image itself that I work with over a longer period of time initially takes anywhere from three months to a year to finish, though, with on and off drawing because I tend to work on several drawings at once.

 

FP  What has inspired you along the way?

SJ  A lot of things have inspired me. Life itself is generally inspiring and full of different encounters with people and information. My drawings are a blend coming from all of these things. However, I think mortality was definitely a primary influence. My father died when I was seven, so I feel like that has impacted how I think about and approach living and art-making alongside growing up as a genderqueer person and the intense questioning that this often leads to about one’s identity and how one interacts with the rest of the world. Studying mythology, spirituality, theology, queer theory and philosophy have all contributed to the pool of ideas I draw from. Individuals like Michel Henry, Joseph Campbell, Judith Butler, Heidegger, Wassily Kandinsky and countless others have all been inspiring.

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FP  Why mostly animal drawings? Are they included in most of the work you do?

SJ  While I do abstract drawings as well, animals are in most of the figurative work I’ve done in the past few years. Mostly dogs that are composed of other natural elements as well, such as leaves, flowers, bones and wood. It’s a metaphor and symbol that I adopted over time, drawing upon the folk tales and myths that I read about as a child and into adulthood. In many mythologies and folk stories, you have dogs symbolizing guardians of the underworld or as the faithful, sometimes mischievous, companion that leads you from the realm of the living into the realm of death. This symbol became very prominent to me while I was visiting my Oma a few years ago shortly after she was diagnosed with breast cancer. I drew so many dogs while I was visiting her and it stuck and became something powerful for me to think about symbolically. This is reflected in the medium that I use and how I work with the mortal marks made by the pen. It’s just a particular way to think about living in awareness of death and not just in the material sense of it, but the spiritual as well (such as thinking about the creation and destruction of ego and/or identity). Other visual influences for me were Byzantine icons. Those images were symbolic realist images and not meant to be understood strictly in a realistic sense. They were symbols for a set of spiritual concepts related to being. To ‘read’ the image in a literal way is to misunderstand it – it requires a more poetic reading to get at full the train of thought. The dogs are like that for me. That said, it’s just my way of thinking about something and I totally don’t expect a viewer to get what I’m thinking about when they walk in and look at what’s on the wall. It is my personal visual poetry, really, and someone else will interpret my images through their own life experiences just like they would when listening to a song by a musician or when reading a poem or something else.

 

FP  Have you done any work on the streets before?

SJ  Not a whole lot. I was pleasantly surprised to be approached by Fresh Paint Gallery. I had a friend who is really involved in street art and has been involved with Fresh Paint for quite a while, IAMBATMAN. She introduced my work to the gallery and they were excited by what I was creating and so they approached me to do something in the space. It’s been really excited to be drawing in a place where the emphasis is on a process-based approach to working on it and where there’s such a strong sense of community. It’s like being in a kind of studio in that sense. It’s been really rewarding to interact with people who come and in from the street to witness the process of artists creating. Visitors get to converse with the artists and gallery volunteers/owners and I think it feels more comfortable for many of them to do that in Fresh Paint Gallery than in a more ‘white cube’ style space.

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FP  Have you ever been involved with the Fresh Paint gallery or the Under Pressure festival before?  In what ways has it benefited and influenced you as an artist? 

SJ  I’ve participated in Beaux Degats before, which is run by Fresh Paint. I had visited Fresh Paint a couple of times in the past and I enjoyed seeing work in the space but hadn’t done any specific projects inside of it until now. I really like how the place is oriented around process as opposed to just hanging things up on the wall. I think that has definitely opened up some new thoughts for me on how I might propose to do projects in the future. Also, it’s been really interesting to see a place where the community devotes so much energy and is so enthusiastic about its project and getting people involved. It has been awesome to watch and be a part of!

MC Baldassari!

 

FP  How did you first find out about Under Pressure? Did you start off as a spectator or an artist?

 

MC  I had heard about it before here and there, but the first time I knew exactly what it was was last summer when I participated.

 

 

FP  What are your comments and thoughts about Under Pressure’s role in the last 19 years in growing the public’s acceptance and knowledge on street art?

 

MC  I know it’s been an event for a longtime  in Montreal. I saw a poster of it when it was in the 90s and I think it’s great that it lasted so long and that it’s kept going strong regardless of other new events like it, like Murale.

 

 MC

 

FP  Other than Under Pressure, have you done work on the streets?

 

MC  Not alot, I started doing arts 4 years ago, studying in industrial unitl 2010. I really started doing art in 2010, and I wasn’t a resident of Canada back then, so I didnt want to get arrested by police or anything. So I hadnt done any street art, but it’s always on my mind.

 

 

 

FP  You have also exhibited at the festival’s Fresh Paint gallery. How does your art and approach differ from the gallery to the festival?

 

MC  I think it’s funny because Fresh Paint was a mix of 2 universe: street art and a regular canvas exhibition. That was a pretty big murale for me also compared to my usual canvases, so it was almost the same thing as doing it on the street. You have to think of doing those murales as a whole; it’s not just putting a canvas on the wall, you are creating a universe where people can come inside and explore.

 

 

 

FP  What effect has the gallery and the festival had on your career as an artist, professionally and personally? Has it helped you grow in any way?

 

MC  Yes of course, that was the biggest wall I had ever done, so it was a pretty big thing for me. I don’t think a lot of artists have an installation like that; a whole wall and canvases they could also put up. So it’s great for my experience and portfolio. This also gave me a lot of feedback from people who saw my work at Fresh Paint, and it really gave me good visibility. Thank you to Fresh Paint and Adrien and everyone!

 

Mc Baldassari Interview!

 

How did you first find out about Under Pressure? Did you start off as a spectator or an artist?

I had heard about it before here and there, but the first time I knew exactly what it was was last summer when I participated.

 

What are your comments and thoughts about Under Pressure’s role in the last 19 years in growing the public’s acceptance and knowledge on street art?

I know it’s been an event for a longtime  in Montreal. I saw a poster of it when it that dated back to the 90s and I think it’s great that it lasted so long and that it’s kept going strong regardless of other new events like it, like Murale.

MC

Other than Under Pressure, have you done work on the streets?

Not alot, I started doing arts 4 years ago, studying in industrial unitl 2010. I really started doing art in 2010, and I wasn’t a resident of Canada back then, so I didnt want to get arrested by police or anything. So I hadnt done any street art, but it’s always on my mind.

 

You have also exhibited at the festival’s Fresh Paint gallery. How does your art and approach differ from the gallery to the festival?

I think it’s funny because Fresh Paint was a mix of 2 universes: street art and a regular canvas exhibition. The exhibition I had at the gallery was a pretty big murale for me also compared to my usual canvases, so it was almost the same thing as doing it on the street. You have to think of doing those murales as a whole; it’s not just putting a canvas on the wall, you are creating a universe where people can come inside and explore.

 

What effect has the gallery and the festival had on your career as an artist, professionally and personally? Has it helped you grow in any way?

Yes of course, that was the biggest wall I had ever done, so it was a pretty big thing for me. I don’t think a lot of artists have an installation like that; a whole wall and canvases they could also put up. So it’s great for my experience and portfolio. This also gave me a lot of feedback from people who saw my work at Fresh Paint, and it really gave me good visibility. Thank you to Fresh Paint and Adrien and everyone!